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Monday, November 7, 2011

October Prayer Letter

"A Song of degrees of David.

If it had not been the LORD who was on our side..." Psalm 124:1

Our praying friends and family in the Lord,

The Lord's greatness is not only illustrated in the answering of our 'big' requests, but in his faithful supply of everyday necessities. This September the Lord, in his infinite wisdom, saw fit to call Hasan, the national pastor I've traveled with since arriving here, home to be with Him. All Summer long Hasan complained of heart trouble. He knew that if he went to the doctor, more than likely, he would be hospitalized. He felt he could hold on till my father-in-law's return; that way, were he hospitalized, his churches would not be without a preacher. Many services we prayed the Lord would heal him, and He did, in the best way possible. Hasan departed the local assembly for the general assembly, his faith of many years finally being made sight. While we mourn his loss, we praise God for that our Christian friendships our eternal, and that one day we'll pick up where we left off, and worship God together while the ages roll. Please keep his family, and the churches he left in your prayers. Also in September, through the loving-kindness of his people, the Lord provided us with a new Dacia Logan MCV (a seven passenger mini-van of sorts). Through the Spring and Summer we drove my father-in-law's van. In the June prayer letter I wrote that we had the funds to put in our order, and just over a month ago we received our vehicle. Praise the Lord, it was a good day getting it dusty on the way to the village. While we want to be good stewards of what the Lord provides, we also want to put as many miles as we can on it for the furtherance of the gospel.

October witnessed the Lord providing us with our first one-year visa. As I wrote to one supporting church:

"In order to obtain a permanent residence visa here (which is the visa we need to live and work in the country for multiple years in succession), we first had to obtain a 6 month temporary, or probationary visa (which we did upon arrival). After that, we had to apply for 'residence', stating it was our wish to stay, and minister in the country indefinitely. The 'residence' visa program is, at present, a ten year contract. We obtain five one-year visas, after which we obtain one five-year visa. Upon completion we will be considered 'residents' of Bulgaria. So long as we are in the 'residency program'- progressing toward permanent residence, we are free to work in the country. This has been a long and costly affair, and we're thankful we're nearing the close for this year."

Praise the Lord, our paperwork was in order and accepted, and we now have our visas. In a few days we will pick up our Bulgarian identity cards stating our visa status. One year down, nine more to go, Lord willing.

October 6th, Bro. Matt and his family returned from their furlough. Their return has allowed me to visit more of the churches that prayed for our safe arrival. Lord willing, as the days progress, I'll be able to visit the bulk of the churches the Lord has established here in Bulgaria. Day in and day out the Lord continues to help us, whether it's in language study, or going to meetings, or accomplishing any of the mundane tasks of life. If He were not with us, and more than that, on 'our side', then even the simplest things would prove overwhelming. Keep us in your daily prayers; the Lord knows our needs. Keep my oldest brother, Craig LeFevre, in your prayers. He was recently involved in a serious car crash on his way to church, in which he sustained a punctured lung, multiple broken ribs, and a fractured pelvis. He is now at home recuperating. Pray for a successful recovery. We love you all. God bless you.


Because of a living Saviour,

The William LeFevre Family

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

The Lord's work

Since leaving the hospital a few weeks ago, the work of the Lord has kept us busy.  The Saturday after being discharged, we had our first baptism of the year in Bulgaria.  28 souls were baptized.  Following the baptism, they had a service that went past midnight.  They sang and rejoiced and testified for hours.  

Sunday morning, my family and I went to Romania, to be with our fellow missionaries at the children's home, for their morning service.  (For the last month or so, US military personnel from the base in Constanta, have been coming out for services.)  The Lord blessed us, as we met together to sing, pray and preach, and glorify the Lord.

That Wednesday, we baptized 18 in Romania, in a channel of the Danube.  Though it was hot outside, they erected a make-shift shelter where Bro. Ralph could preach in the shade.  It was wonderful to see so many, with so little, enjoy themselves so much in the Lord.

Today we buried Pastor Hasan.  He's the national pastor I've been driving to meetings 5 days a week, since arriving in Bulgaria.  We became as good a friends as the language barrier allowed; better even, as our friendship was in Christ and for the spread of the gospel.  Hasan was a faithful minister, and a caring pastor.  He loved going to the meetings, not only to preach, but to find out how his members fared.  Before every meeting he would greet every one personally and ask how they were doing.  He was a gracious man.  Though I knew very little of the language, he would always encourage me to take part in the services in whatever capacity I could.  When I first learned my Turkish numbers, he had me call out the hymn numbers for the congregation.  I had no idea what the hymns said, and he knew that, but it gave me practice.  Last Tuesday Hasan, his wife, and I went to Yunak, a meeting close by.  He sang well, he preached well, he seemed strong in body.  An hour after we returned from the meeting, and I had dropped him off, his grandson came running to the house, asking me to come and take Hasan to the hospital, as he was having chest pains.  We rushed him to the nearest hospital, but after an hour the pain subsided, and they told him to go home and rest.  He rested one day and was back in meetings by Thursday. Friday I picked him up and he seemed stronger and happier than I had seen him in a month.  We went to Sadavo, where I noticed, he was rubbing his chest.  Still, he sang strong and preached from John 9.  At Venelin, he conducted a special meeting at a believers house, who had the church over for a thanks-giving meal.  He preached, ate supper, and rejoiced with everyone in attendance.  I took him home that evening, and 30 minutes later they came and told me he had collapsed.  Again, we rushed him to the nearest hospital.  There, they realized he needed more urgent care than they could provide, so they took by ambulance to the university hospital in Varna.  That was the last his family saw him alive.  After arrival (and dismissing the family), the doctors concluded there was nothing they could do for him.  They called the family Monday, and told them to come get him Tuesday, and let him rest at home.  On Tuesday morning they called again to say he was dead.  About a month ago, Hasan told me he knew he was ill, that there was something wrong with his heart, but that he couldn't go to the hospital until Bro. Matt returned, as he couldn't leave his churches without someone to preach to them.  

Today, at the funeral, the believers from Dolgapol (tomorrows village) asked if we would still come.  I was happy to tell them yes, and that we would sing, and pray, and thank God for Hasan, and rejoice that we'll see him again.

It's good to be in the Lord's work, whether that means lying in a hospital bed with pneumonia, standing at a river side watching new Christians exercise their faith, or sitting with a grieving family as they say their goodbyes.  The Lord is good.  The Lord's work is worth it: a fact I'm sure Hasan would tell you now.

William LeFevre

PS - Please make it a point to pray for our national pastors.  Recently, the support they receive, that puts gas in their tanks, and food on their tables, has dropped off significantly.  These men are all full time, pastoring multiple churches, laboring to start more.  Without them, we missionaries couldn't cover half the churches they look after.  Please pray that the Lord will stir hearts to help the national pastors fund through Charity Baptist missions.  God bless you all.

Sunday, August 21, 2011

August 2011 prayer letter

"A Song of degrees of David.

I was glad when they said unto me, Let us go into the house of the LORD." Psalm 122:1


Our praying friends and family in the Lord,

What a privilege it is to be able to attend 'God's House'! There is nothing like it on earth, when fellow believers come together, in one mind and one accord, for the express purpose of worshipping God. It's a little slice of 'Heaven on earth'. It reminds us that we're only pilgrims here, and that our pilgrimage won't be long, and that one day we'll arrive at the "house of the LORD", never to depart. These refreshing truths were made all the clearer, as we recently attended our second missionary camp meeting. (Three times a year, all the missionaries cooperating together to reach the Turks here, gather for four or five days of English preaching and singing.) The first camp meeting we attended was soon after our arrival, and having just been in almost two years of services stateside, it felt like any other camp meeting. But now, after having been isolated, for the most part, from regular English speaking interaction outside of the home, this camp meeting was sweet. It makes a difference when you can't afford to have division. No one can afford to come to meeting with a chip on their shoulder, lest they miss a blessing, and have to go another three months without hearing preaching in their mother tongue. I go to meetings all the time here, and while I don't understand the language well enough yet, I'm aware of God's presence, and am able, in measure, to participate in the services through song and prayer. Still, there's an intimacy in hearing the "wonderful works of God" in your own language. That's why, though we live and labor in Bulgaria, and, for the most part, these Bulgarian Turks all speak fluent Bulgarian, it's our desire to learn Turkish, to speak 'their' language.

I began this letter, early on the morning of the 12th. I had been ill, suffering for a couple of days with what I thought was a strain of the flu. Friday morning I awoke early, feeling better than I had, and determined to see my wife to a doctor's appointment. As the day wore on, I began to feel worse and worse. As we were in the area anyway, I stopped by our family physician to see if she couldn't recommend something to take care of this flu. After listening to me breathe, she recommended an x-ray. Upon receipt of that, she informed me I had pneumonia. I was told only the hospital could administer medication strong enough to help me, and that I was to report immediately there. I knew I wasn't well, I just didn't know how ill I was. They admitted me that night with a 103.5 degree fever, and told me I would remain there a mandatory 7 days. The hospital was exceptional by Bulgarian standards, and all the staff I encountered were friendly and as helpful as they could be regardless of the language barrier. Because of my inability to communicate, I was at their mercy as to what they prescribed me and why, and could only pray that the Lord would help me. My wife asked me, before being admitted, if I was nervous. I told her I felt too bad to be nervous. But, looking back, I wasn't nervous at all. In fact, all I could do was resign myself to God's will, trusting that he had me there for his purpose. And, in spite of my physical discomfort, I enjoyed a week of fellowship with the Lord: reading and praying and enjoying His company. I am now home, and on a high powered antibiotic for a few more days. I feel a tad weak in body, but refreshed in the Lord. Please keep me in your prayers, that the Lord would grant a full recovery, and that I would soon feel myself again. Also, please keep us in your prayers, as our residency visas will soon come due. We are presently here on a 6 month visa, awaiting our residency visas. We have other prayer requests, and the Lord knows them all. Help me believe God for the needs of this work, and ours as well. God bless you all.


Because of a living Saviour,

The William LeFevre Family

Friday, August 19, 2011

Home

Dear praying friends,

Thank you all very much for the kind expressions of love sent during my hospital stay.  Also, thank you, from the depths of my heart, for your prayers.  I can't express their worth in words, the Lord knows.  I was discharged from the hospital today, at 11 AM Bulgarian time.  The doctors came in this morning at 6 and woke me up to draw blood.  Then 30 minutes later, they returned to stick my finger for more blood.  An hour later the Dr. came by, spoke to me in Bulgarian, and left (I still don't know what he said.)  Later a nurse dropped my with a prescription (for some extremely high-powered antibiotics) and my discharge papers.

I am now with my family at my brothers house, and we'll soon make our way back to Dabravino.  Please continue to pray for us.  We love you all.  God bless you.

William LeFevre

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Update from William

William wrote this letter from the hospital and asked me to mail it for him. At the visit today I spoke to the doctor and they said he might get out in a day or two. We can't wait to have him back home. 

Hannah



Dear praying friends,

Let me say firstly, The Lord is good, always has been, always will be, especially to me.  He treats me very well, in fact it seems I'm spoiled by his goodness.

I'm writing this from a cafe near to the hospital where I'm staying.  This is the first day I've been out of my room.  I was admitted Friday evening, after our doctor concluded I had pneumonia.  I thought at first, that I had merely contracted a strain of flu going around.  Wednesday morning I awoke feeling 'achy'; Thursday morning, still achy, I felt slightly feverish, but, thought this would be the worst.  Friday morning I awoke early, cleaned up, and felt well enough to take Hannah to her Dr.'s appt. in Shumen.  As the morning progressed, I began to wear down, and thought, that while we were here I may as well have the Dr. check me out too.  I wasn't expecting the diagnosis.  But, having accepted it, I resigned myself to whatever the Lord had for me.  Friday afternoon, we returned to Dabravino (a little over an hour away) collected what I'd need for my stay, and then made our way back to the hospital via Zlatna Niva to pick up Zach to help us with admitting and driving arrangements.  I was admitted that night with a 103.5 temp, a little sore and weak, but contented in the Lord.  I can honestly say that I've enjoyed the peace of God during this whole experience.  I don't feel well, still at the writing of this, (I have a port in my left arm through which they administer meds once or twice a day), but I know who is with me, and have been blessed with his fellowship.  Thank you all very much for your prayers.  Please keep Hannah and the boys in your prayers.  And pray for this work.  I have confidence in the Lord concerning anything I might go through here.  But let's pray the Lord blesses this work, and makes the days and years to come, the best yet.  It seems that everything the Lord commences, he concludes better.  It is my prayer, that this work, that He so obviously began, He will, even now, bless exceeding abundantly above anything He has done previously, and show us all again, that, He is God and beside him there is none else.

Pray for us, the Lord knows our needs.  You're in my prayers, daily.  God bless you.  

William 

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Update on William

Dear Friends and Family,

I wanted to update everyone on William's condition. I have had so many people contact me to let me know that they were praying for us. It is so wonderful to know that there are so many people who care about us and are praying. It is through your prayers that we are able to stay here in Bulgaria.

Today is the is fifth day that William has been in the hospital. Every day Verity or Zach drive me into Shumen so that I can visit William and take him food. It has been such a blessing to have them over here. Katy and Polly (my nieces) have been able to babysit the children so that I can visit William. Yesterday when I went to visit, I was quite worried because William looked very pale and didn't seem to be improving. However, by evening time he had finally been able to get some sleep and it really seemed to improve his condition. The first couple days he had not been able to sleep at all. I think that the combination of exhaustion and pneumonia were really taking a toil on him. Today when I visited him though, his color was improving and he was a bit more talkative. I have read him the letters that some of you sent and he was very happy to hear from you. Thank you once again for all your prayers. We love you all.

Hannah LeFevre

So we thy people and sheep of thy pasture will give thee thanks for ever: we will shew forth thy praise to all generations. Psalm 79:13

Sunday, August 14, 2011

William

Dear Friends and Family,

I am writing from Zlatna Niva, Bulgaria. The boys and I are staying at Zach and Verity's (my brother and sister in-law)  home for a week. William has been sick for a couple days and yesterday he was feeling so ill that he decided to go the doctor. We know one doctor here in Bulgaria who works in a town called Shumen; which is a little over an hour away from where we live. The doctor doesn't speak any English but I knew enough Bulgarian to be able to communicate with her. She checked William's breathing and then sent us to a lab on the other side of town to get an X-ray and blood work done. After about 20 minutes of looking for an 'orange building' we found it. We took the X-ray back to the doctor's office and after she looked at it she said that William had Bronchial Pneumonia. She told us that he would have to be hospitalized. We tried to see if their was any way to treat it at home (since we live so far away, and I can't drive over here) but she said that the medications he needed were only available at the hospital. 
Once we left the doctor's office we drove back home and I packed a bag for William. In Bulgaria the hospital doesn't provided personal items so you have to bring your own plate, fork, toilet paper, towel, food, water, etc. We found someone to watch the house for a couple days, and then headed to Zach's house. Zach only lives about 15 minutes from the hospital so I left the boys with Verity and Zach drove William and me to the hospital. 
The first thing I noticed about the hospital was that it was clean. This is unusual for Bulgaria. When we arrived they took William's passport info and then after looking at his X-ray they gave him an EKG test. I don't know why they did this but they did. The equipment they were using looked really old too. After that they took his blood about 4 times and then inserted a port. He was allowed to go to his room after that. He was very sleepy and kept complaining about his head hurting him. It was 
at that point I took his temperature and it was 103.6 F. The doctor's were very concerned about his fever and immediately sent me to the pharmacy to buy him some fever meds and a thermometer. (Over here you also have to supply your own thermometer) They gave him two shots and put him on an IV. I spoke to the doctors for a little while and did some translating for William before heading back to Zlatna Niva. Once I got home, I cried. I don't know if it was because I was sad, sleepy, nervous, or all three; but afterwards I felt much better. :) 
This morning I headed back to the hospital to take William some lunch and supper. His fever is down to 99.7 now and he seems to be doing a little better. I did google one of the meds he is taking and it is banned in 50 countries; after reading that I decided I wouldn't look up any of the other ones. 
We are in God's hands and I know that he will take care of us. Please pray that the hospital bill will not be very expense as we have our visa fees due shortly. We covet your prayers.

Love, 

Hannah LeFevre

Wednesday, June 8, 2011

Re: June Prayer Letter



"Many, O LORD my God, are thy wonderful works which thou hast done,
and thy thoughts which are to us–ward: they cannot be reckoned up in order unto thee:
if I would declare and speak of them, they are more than can be numbered." Psalm 40:5

Our praying friends and family in the Lord,

Greetings. I trust this letter finds you all well, strong in faith, giving glory to God. All the churches I attend here send their greetings. I have been driving Bro. Hasan, accompanying him to his meetings, since shortly after arriving here. We go to nine meetings a week. In all the time I've been here, there hasn't failed a service that I haven't heard someone, either in prayer or testimony, thank God for the American believers. They are always conscious of the love you all have shown them, in the sending of missionaries, and your sacrificial giving to help meet their needs. Bro. Hasan prays fervently, every service, for the American pastors, that God would bless you all and empower you to preach the gospel. Please pray for these men, as they do for you.

Testimonies. The believers in Kamarevo, though desperately poor, are nevertheless rich in joy. This is one of the happiest meetings I attend, and I look forward to it every Saturday. They sing louder, longer, and with more enthusiasm than churches double their number. Recently, during the service, an elderly sister exhorted the crowd never to be afraid to testify. "Don't be fearful. You should always stand and thank God for something!" That's pretty good advice. And she's a good example, happily testifying every service. Last week, in the village of Sadavo, a family called for us to come and pray for the man of the house, who was very sick. We sang a few hymns, and then gathered round the man and prayed. Afterwards, Bro. Hasan told the man, "Now when you get better, come to the church and testify." Bro. Hasan's faith blessed me. He didn't tell the man, "Well, I hope you get better. I'm praying for you."; but stated as a matter of fact, "when you get better", and not as a natural course of events, as the man was evidently very sick, but as the supernatural result of prayer. I like that kind of faith. That's the kind of faith that saves a seat for you at the meeting, expecting you to show up and tell what God's done for you.

Praises. The Lord graciously supplies all we need. When my father-in-law left, he left us with the use of his van, ensuring I wouldn't be without transportation. But this was a temporary provision, as he wouldn't be away too long. Yet, before I had even left the States, the Lord had given me the assurance that he'd provide a vehicle. I even went out and picked up a little key-chain by faith. Well, this last week I was able to put in an order for a car of our own. The Lord does all things well, and we praise Him for it! At the same time I bought the key-chain, I purchased a welcome-mat too. I see that welcome-mat every day, and trust the same God who puts cars to key-chains will soon put a house to a welcome mat! I don't know how, but the 'knowing how' is not my business. I bless him for what was, is, and is to come. Speaking of which, Hannah and I celebrated our 3rd wedding anniversary this month. We marvel at how far the Lord has brought us, all that He's done for us, and how exceeding abundantly He's blessed us in these few short years. Can you imagine, with a God this good, what the future holds for us?!

We love you all. Keep us in your prayers as we continue to study the language, that God might use us, in our limited capacity, to be a blessing. God bless you all.

Because of a living Saviour,

The William LeFevre Family

June Prayer Letter

"Many, O LORD my God, are thy wonderful works which thou hast done,
and thy thoughts which are to us–ward: they cannot be reckoned up in order unto thee:
if I would declare and speak of them, they are more than can be numbered." Psalm 40:5

Our praying friends and family in the Lord,

Greetings. I trust this letter finds you all well, strong in faith, giving glory to God. All the churches I attend here send their greetings. I have been driving Bro. Hasan, accompanying him to his meetings, since shortly after arriving here. We go to nine meetings a week. In all the time I've been here, there hasn't failed a service that I haven't heard someone, either in prayer or testimony, thank God for the American believers. They are always conscious of the love you all have shown them, in the sending of missionaries, and your sacrificial giving to help meet their needs. Bro. Hasan prays fervently, every service, for the American pastors, that God would bless you all and empower you to preach the gospel. Please pray for these men, as they do for you.

Testimonies. The believers in Kamarevo, though desperately poor, are nevertheless rich in joy. This is one of the happiest meetings I attend, and I look forward to it every Saturday. They sing louder, longer, and with more enthusiasm than churches double their number. Recently, during the service, an elderly sister exhorted the crowd never to be afraid to testify. "Don't be fearful. You should always stand and thank God for something!" That's pretty good advice. And she's a good example, happily testifying every service. Last week, in the village of Sadavo, a family called for us to come and pray for the man of the house, who was very sick. We sang a few hymns, and then gathered round the man and prayed. Afterwards, Bro. Hasan told the man, "Now when you get better, come to the church and testify." Bro. Hasan's faith blessed me. He didn't tell the man, "Well, I hope you get better. I'm praying for you."; but stated as a matter of fact, "when you get better", and not as a natural course of events, as the man was evidently very sick, but as the supernatural result of prayer. I like that kind of faith. That's the kind of faith that saves a seat for you at the meeting, expecting you to show up and tell what God's done for you.

Praises. The Lord graciously supplies all we need. When my father-in-law left, he left us with the use of his van, ensuring I wouldn't be without transportation. But this was a temporary provision, as he wouldn't be away too long. Yet, before I had even left the States, the Lord had given me the assurance that he'd provide a vehicle. I even went out and picked up a little key-chain by faith. Well, this last week I was able to put in an order for a car of our own. The Lord does all things well, and we praise Him for it! At the same time I bought the key-chain, I purchased a welcome-mat too. I see that welcome-mat every day, and trust the same God who puts cars to key-chains will soon put a house to a welcome mat! I don't know how, but the 'knowing how' is not my business. I bless him for what was, is, and is to come. Speaking of which, Hannah and I celebrated our 3rd wedding anniversary this month. We marvel at how far the Lord has brought us, all that He's done for us, and how exceeding abundantly He's blessed us in these few short years. Can you imagine, with a God this good, what the future holds for us?!

We love you all. Keep us in your prayers as we continue to study the language, that God might use us, in our limited capacity, to be a blessing. God bless you all.

Because of a living Saviour,

The William LeFevre Family

Thursday, April 21, 2011

April Prayer Letter


" And David the king came and sat before the LORD, and said, Who am I, O LORD God,

and what is mine house, that thou hast brought me hitherto?" 1 Chronicles 17:16


Our praying friends and family in the Lord,

Merhaba! Greetings from Dabravino, Bulgaria. God is very good to us: not only did we arrive safe and sound, and without incident, our bags arrived with us. We were assisted every step of our journey. Even at check in at the airport, when so much has the potential to go wrong, the Lord had a missionary mother working the counter, whose gracious help set the tone for our travels. Upon arriving in Varna, we were greeted at the airport by fellow missionaries and family members.Soon after our arrival we traveled to Sofia to meet with our attorney. We then traveled to Greece, to apply for our visas (they have to be applied for at a foreign Bulgarian embassy). The entire visa process is both costly and time consuming, but a necessity to remain and labor here. Once applied for, it can take up to (and sometimes exceed) three months to receive them. Please pray that there wont be any problem with the paperwork and the receiving of our visas.

We have spent the last several weeks getting adjusted to village life. The pace is much slower, but there is no shortage of activity. Already I've had the privilege of attending several church services in the surrounding villages. The people, though terribly poor, nevertheless count themselves rich that God would send them the gospel, and missionaries to preach it. I have been humbled numerous times over, as the poorest people I've seen express their love and gratitude for coming to be with them. Please make it a point to pray, that the Lord will help me with the language, that I may declare the wonderful works of God to these people. In addition, I've also been privileged to help distribute flour to many of the poor Turkish believers. What a blessing to be one of His 'disciples' distributing bread to the hungry multitudes!

A point or two to pray about: if you think about it, please pray as we begin our search for a vehicle. Gas is approaching eight dollars a gallon; the roads are in a horrible state of disrepair; and we need something that's both sturdy and economical. The Lord is able. Also, pray for us as we search for a dwelling of our own. Presently, we are staying at my father-in-law, Matthew Welch's, as they are on furlough in the States. Soon, though, we will have to have a place we can call home. Pray that the Lord will direct us where to settle, and provide the dwelling.

I can't tell you what a relief it is, what confidence it provides, knowing we have a God whose desire is toward us, who not only has all we need, but takes pleasure in providing it. What a blessing to say with the Psalmist, that the Lord has "brought me hitherto"! That acknowledges and implies three things: that the Lord did for me what I could not do on my own; and as it was He who brought me here, He will take care of me while here; finally, as He was able to see me thus far, I am assured He will see me all the way home.

Finally, let me say, we miss all of you. We're not alone, and not lonely, merely separated from those whom God has made dear to us. It is our desire to have the best of both worlds. If we could, we'd love and labor here by day, and come home to you all at night. Alas, God's work necessitates a separation, which makes Heaven all the sweeter. Thank God for the day when we'll never have to say 'Goodbye' again. Still, we're not very far apart, as the throne of grace is close at hand to us all; and as the song writer wrote, "though sundered far, by faith we meet around one common mercy seat!' Please pray for us. You all are in our prayers. We love you.

Because of a living Saviour,

The William LeFevre Family

PS - Our new field address is below


William LeFevre

PO BOX 627

Centralna Poshta

Varna 9000

BULGARIA



Wednesday, March 16, 2011

Safe Arrival

Made it safely to Bulgaria, without any major complications.  In Varna today getting paper work done.  Pray for us, that everything works out with our visas.  Also, I have a very special object of prayer I'd like you to pray about; the Lord knows what it is.  God bless you all,  We love you.

William

Tuesday, March 1, 2011

February Prayer Letter

"... So he bringeth them unto their desired haven.  Oh that men would praise the LORD for his goodness,

and for his wonderful works to the children of men!"  Psalm 107:30b, 31

 

Our praying friends and family in the Lord,

Desiring  Since the middle of 2009, it has been our desire to love and labour in the field of Bulgaria.  My wife and I prayed to that end, and by faith prepared for it's realization.  We are very happy to announce (and grateful to God for all his provisions making it a reality) that, Lord willing, March 11th we will depart for our 'desired haven'.  We are heading to Bulgaria to lend whatever hand we can, as Missionary Matt Welch returns for a six month furlough, in easing the burden his departure will bring; and to prepare for the work the Lord would have us to do.  God's goodness is beyond description, and all his gifts unspeakable.  We are blessed!  "Delight thyself also in the LORD; and he shall give thee the desires of thine heart." Psalm 37:4

Speaking of 'the desires of the heart', recently, in the midst of packing our belongings for shipping, my wife's engagement ring slipped off her finger.  We made a diligent search of every possible place it could have been, but came up wanting.  My wife was sick with worry and remorse.  However, by the grace of God, I was cheered.  We had just witnessed three months of God's richest and miraculous blessings in providing all we needed to move overseas.  I was confident that the God who could raise support, secure a vehicle, facilitate shipping, and reserve plane tickets, could find a little lost ring.  Sure enough, two weeks later, in a purse she had received as a gift, and had tucked away, my wife found her ring.  Someone told her, "My scientific brain tells me God didn't put it there, and if it were me, I'd rack by brain trying to remember how and when it got there!"  But I prefer Hannah's explanation, "For all I know God might have put it there just so that I could find it. I believe He is capable of doing things like that. I am thankful I lost the ring, because I prayed so much about it, that when I found the ring it was such a revelation to me. I felt so special. It suddenly struck me that the God of Heaven was so interested in me that he would answer even the smallest request."  And what a revelation that is, to know that our God's not only interested in the 'big picture' of us getting to, and sustaining us while on the field, but also in each and every of the smallest details of our lives.  What confidence that provides us, that, come what may, be it big or small, be it a great sum or pennies, in life or in death, our God is with us, to aid us in our time of need!

Praying.  "Finally, brethren, pray for us, that the word of the Lord may have free course, and be glorified, even as it is with you:" 2 Thessalonians 3:1  It has been our great privilege on deputation to both renew, and to make many new acquaintances.  Such is the nature of deputation: not only is it the necessary burden to secure support enabling a missionary to go where God calls him; but also the means of meeting and forging loving friendships that will span the ocean.  The Lord has so ordained it, that we cannot labour independently; we are bound one to another in the fulfilling of the great commission, as senders and sent ones; but how gracious the Lord has been to Hannah and I, in that you are our supporters; that we are not names on a page, absent from your presence, and so absent from your thoughts, but that your care is felt in your words of encouragement, and especially your prayers.  It's a wonderful blessing to know there are yet thousands who have not 'bowed the knee to the image of Baal'.  "Brethren, pray for us." Thessalonians 5:25  As you have, so continue to do, and more.  We have enjoyed your company in America, in your churches, and your homes, but how much more do we need you now, as we take our leave of you.  Pray that God will help us in learning the language, especially.  Pray for our family: that Hannah and I would be Spirit-filled parents, and that our little boys will be saved, and fall in love with Jesus.  Pray that God will fill us for use on the field.  And if you think about it, pray that our car sells.

Farewell.  As this is the last prayer letter we'll be writing from America for a while, I wanted to say 'thank you'.  The Lord has certainly used you all to be a blessing to us, and in turn we pray the Lord uses us to be a blessing to others.  We love you all.  "The LORD bless thee, and keep thee:  The LORD make his face shine upon thee, and be gracious unto thee:  The LORD lift up his countenance upon thee, and give thee peace." Numbers 6:24-26

 

"Finally, brethren, farewell. Be perfect, be of good comfort, be of one mind, live in peace;

and the God of love and peace shall be with you." 2 Corinthians 13:11

Because of a living Saviour,


The William LeFevre Family